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These 'Don't Smoke and Drive' posters from Uruguay are made of marijuana

Created for Uruguay’s Association of Cannabis Studies, these “potsters” are an out-of-home initiative featuring three posters printed on paper made from marijuana. Copy reminds the public about the dangers of operating a vehicle under the influence of pot, which Uruguay fully legalized for production and sale in 2013.

Each of the signs measures 5.6 feet high by 3 feet wide and carries the tagline, “If you smoked, don’t drive.” They sprouted just after Christmas in highly trafficked areas of Montevideo, and will stay on the streets for a few more weeks.

“We reasoned that if posters made out of pot gave you advice about safer driving, it was probably the most ideal way in which marijuana can actually be beneficial to someone while behind the wheel,” says Juan Ciapessoni, co-founder and chief creative officer of The Electric Factory, which developed the campaign with outdoor ad firm JCDecaux.

Once the fibrous hemp was shredded, flattened and dried, the sheets were painstakingly hand-crafted, just as an artisan might create specialty papers from scraps of recycled material. A silk-screening process was used to apply the text. (Ciapessoni declined to reveal how much weed was used to create the posters, nor would he divulge its source.)

Sure, it’s a gimmick to grab attention, but “the main objective of all of this is to make people understand how important is to be very responsible when driving,” Ciapessoni says. “It was equally important for us to send a big message so that it will have meaningful social impact.”

The “potsters” are also vandal proof – anyone thinking of stealing the signs and trying to smoke them are in for a let down.

“It would be really funny, but not effective, because the process for producing the paper removed the psychoactive effect,” says Ciapessoni. “So if someone smoked it, it would be like smoking a standard paper.”

Via: Ad Week

Maestro's "Only those who risk it deserve to drink it" campaign

Maestro challenged people to find the courage to stick their hand into the unknown and those brave enough were rewarded  with festive spirit.
Customers in Tbilisi mall in Georgia who were going about their day-to-day activities were unexpectedly put in a  truly unique position. Those who dared to reach into the unknown were surprised with the chance to experience the remarkable feeling of being the real maestro and conducting the a live orchestra!
We recalled the saying : “He who doesn’t risk, never gets to drink champagne” and those who found the courage and lived up to the spirit, were welcomed with a miracle.
[youtube width=”300px” height=”200px”]I0OE1USZII8[/youtube]
Via: Best Ads on TV and Ads of the World
 
 

Coughing billboard highlights the risks of smoking

Similar to Posterscope and Carat Scotland’s 2015 coughing billboard to raise awareness of lung cancer, to most passersby, Åkestam Holst’s latest work for pharmacy Apoteket Hjärtat seems like an ordinary billboard.
But thanks to in-built smoke detectors that react to smokers lighting up and smoking anywhere near it,  when someone near the screen lights a cigarette, the billboard awakens. The model featured in the billboard then starts coughing before the smoker  gets tips on various nicotine-products to substitute smoking.
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Via: Little Black Book
 
 

Posterscope round table discusses: How do we solve a problem like creativity?

Group photo  (back row, l-r) Gideon Spanier, head of media, Campaign; Stephen Whyte, CEO, Posterscope UK; Julian Linley, multimedia consultant; Barnaby Dawe, global chief marketing officer, Just Eat; Claire Beale, global editor-in-chief, Campaign; Helen Weisinger, chief client officer, Outdoor Plus; Glen Wilson, managing director, Posterscope UK; (front row, l-r) Emma de la Fosse, chief creative officer, Ogilvy & Mather Group UK; Nicky Bullard, chairman and chief creative officer, MRM Meteorite; Rick Hirst, CEO, Carat UK; Justin Tindall, group chief creative officer, M&C Saatchi; Sir John Hegarty, founder, Bartle Bogle Hegarty and The Garage; Robert Campbell, creative entrepreneur and founder of Rainey Kelly Campbell Roalfe/Y&R; Katie Dulake, head of brand and marketing, TSB Bank

Marketers, creatives and media owners were invited by Posterscope to discuss out-of-home creativity. Campaign’s Stuart Derrick listened in.

You don’t have to press advertising folk or marketers too hard to come up with their favourite poster campaign. Whether it’s The Economist’s clever copy, British Airways’ “#lookup”, numerous eye-catching Nike ads, Araldite’s iconic stuck-on car poster, or any number of mood-shifting political campaigns, out-of-home packs a memorable punch.

Gideon Spanier, Campaign‘s head of media, who chaired the debate on the state of creativity in OOH, kicked off the conversation with the recognition that, while the £1bn sector is in rude health, with revenue up for the eighth year in a row, there remains a concern that not all marketers and creative agencies are still inspired to create engaging OOH creative.

Posterscope CEO Stephen Whyte said: “OOH has a long history of strong, impactful creative and, today, brands such as Apple are using it to great effect, but lately this has tended to be an exception rather than the norm.”

He asked what the challenge is for creative teams, and why they are not excited about the creative opportunity in OOH. “As an industry, we need to do more to champion the creative strengths of the medium. Seeing more powerful, engaging OOH will be the best way to motivate both agencies and clients to want and demand the best work for their brands.”

And creatives themselves still love OOH. Emma de la Fosse, chief creative officer of Ogilvy & Mather Group UK, said: “When I trained, distilling the campaign message to four words on a 48-sheet was considered the skill of advertising. It’s what got me into the industry.”

With many evolving formats, the medium may have lost its essence by trying to be all things, according to Justin Tindall, group chief creative officer of M&C Saatchi. “It’s become a generalist in a world obsessed with specialists,” he added.
Barnaby Dawe, global chief marketing officer of Just Eat, appreciates the traditional marketing mix and the extreme measurability of pay-per-click in equal measure. OOH is one of his brand’s key advertising channels.

“The climate in which we operate, where the CEO and CFO want to see ROI, means that PPC becomes an unhealthy addiction, with its ability to demonstrate instant effectiveness,” he said. “Outdoor is up against both traditional broadcast media and also new media, such as carousel and canvas ads on Facebook. As a generalist marketer, I’m keen to show how effective a combination of both performance and outdoor media can be.”

Creative solutions
Creative legend Sir John Hegarty, founder of Bartle Bogle Hegarty and The Garage, said the challenge faced by OOH is also manifest in the wider ad industry.

“A generation of marketing directors are failing to understand how to build powerful brands – they confuse persuasion and promotion,” he argued. “Focusing on just short-term promotional messages. They’ve lost faith in long-term brand building. Maybe it’s too difficult for them?”

In this environment, there has been a loss of bravery in committing to a medium that doesn’t have the rack of analytics of digital. “For clients who are driven by, and rewarded for, an almost instantaneous focus on results, it can be difficult to keep posters on the plan,” Rick Hirst, CEO of Carat UK, said.
Katie Dulake, head of brand and marketing at TSB Bank, added that OOH can play a different role. For a challenger brand, it provides reach. “Our brand purpose is bringing local banking back to the UK. It’s all about where people live and work, so OOH is great for that. It also supplements our physical brand presence – our branches – on the high street,” she said.

However, there was a feeling around the table that creative agencies don’t design for the medium. “A 48-sheet brief could have been career defining at one time,” said Claire Beale, global editor in chief of Campaign, who pondered whether creative directors still fought over them.

“We used to go out and look at poster sites to get an idea of context and where the message would be,” Robert Campbell, creative entrepreneur and co-founder of Rainey Kelly Campbell Roalfe/Y&R, said. “People do not give it that time any more.”

Helen Weisinger, who recently joined Outdoor Plus as chief client officer from a creative agency background, said there was a knowledge gap in the market and education was the key. “Creative and measurement are the two areas where people don’t know what OOH can do yet,” she contended.

De la Fosse suggested specialist OOH media agencies and media owners should increasingly work with creative agencies to stimulate creatives and push boundaries, as was the case with Ogilvy & Mather’s “#lookup” campaign for British Airways.

Glen Wilson, managing director of Posterscope UK, suggested the industry might be lacking bravery, and that incentivising creativity either through reviewing the creative awards programmes for OOH or reducing the cost of inventory based on creative excellence might be the way forward.

Hegarty advised agencies to get back to basic principles and an understanding of how value is built.

“Technology enables opportunity, creativity creates value,” he said. “So, as posters increasingly become a digital offering, [they provide] creative opportunity and cultural importance. They should also embrace wall painting. Call it Craft Advertising. Think how famous Banksy became from his wall art.”

The consensus was that, rather than focus on what posters can and can’t do, there is a need to focus on deliverables and objectives – to get back to what OOH does best and change the conversation to highlight that this is a medium where creativity can flourish.

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“Apple’s ‘Shot on iPhone’ is one of the best poster campaigns of the last three years. I don’t care how many pixels the camera has. If it takes pictures like that, I want it”

– Sir John Hegarty, founder of Bartle Bogle Hegarty and The Garage

 

“If you can’t tell the story on a poster, it’s not a story worth telling”

– Nicky Bullard, chairman and chief creative officer, MRM Meteorite

 

“Data and technology present a great opportunity for DOOH but we shouldn’t ignore the scale, creative opportunity and fame-building strength the medium provides”

– Stephen Whyte, CEO, Posterscope

 “There’s pushback against clickbait to focus on quality content that speaks directly to an audience. It’s hard to gain attention through the noise online, but posters can cut through by virtue of being more environmental”

– Julian Linley, multimedia consultant

The full article on Campaign Live can be read here

McDonald's create the rear-view invitation

As the old saying goes: You only regret the things you didn’t do.
DDB Stockholm designed a billboard positioned just after passing a McDonald’s restaurant. The billboard was designed to be  laterally reversed so that the consumer would get the message “It’s never too late to turn around. Next U-turn 100 meters” in their rear-view mirror. 
Via: Best Ads on TV

Posterscope share location expertise

By Dominique Fyson, Strategic Account Director
As part of the Digital Academy series, last week Posterscope hosted a Mobile and Location session, the final in a 4-part mobile series led by Fetch.
The aim of the session was to demonstrate how Posterscope are using mobile in the OOH industry and Strategic Account Directors Dominique Fyson and Brad Gilbert covered 4 key areas:
Planning OOH using mobile data:
Thanks to smart phones, we now have access to large data sources that allow us to break away from traditional audience demographics, and enable us to plan based on behaviours and interests. To achieve this we have created a number of partnerships in order to access a variety of mobile data. Firstly our exclusive partnership with EE gives us access to telco data. Secondly our partnership with tech start-up Locomizer gives us access to both social and mobile GPS data.
Location Analytics:
Alongside planning OOH more efficiently, we are now using mobile data to build out our location expertise, beyond planning posters and digital screens. So we are using this granular mobile data to truly understand different audiences, where they are, what they are doing and where they are going. We know that location analysis is becoming increasingly important to all of our clients, so we are constantly building and evolving this offering, and offering insights and services that go beyond the media plan.
Mobile Media and OOH:
Planning OOH alongside mobile isn’t just about using data. As we know that 99% of smartphone owners will use their device while OOH in a given week, it gives us the opportunity to create synergies between the two channels, and to really support the brand messaging. Working with Fetch we can now activate these two mediums side by side.
Building Mobile Engagement:
Lastly we looked at how we can use mobile tech to create engagement in the OOH space. We are constantly looking for new solutions to link these two channels, and to close the loop between knowing someone saw an OOH ad, and then completed a particular action. The mobile experience is obviously really important as we all have to deal with low-time, low-attention consumers. Therefore we are really interested in tech that has the potential to be easily adopted in the market, and is easy for consumers to understand. We then ran through some examples such as Beacons, linking OOH and social media apps like Snapchat and Instagram, physical payments through contactless technology, amplification of live events and dynamic OOH capabilities.
Finally the session concluded with a short presentation from our mobile partner Meshh, who have created a way of connecting any mobile device to any billboard within seconds, allowing for the immediate transfer or download of relevant digital content. The technology does not require an app and works without the need for any data or internet connection. They are a fascinating company, and we are hoping to work closely with them across 2017.

Sticky notes to Instagram now meets OOH

Instagram sticky note artist, book illustrator and social truth giver Chaz Hutton has taken his un-cannily spot-on sketches out-of-home.
Chaz’s Instagram account @instachaaz shares post it note sized tru-isms and he has just launched a collection in his book ‘A Sticky Note Guide to Life.’
To celebrate the launch he has used topical and relevant OOH to launch the book.
The content at Strouts Place explains how to draw a stick figure, one incensed and one depressed as the tagline says, ‘It’s been a tough year. This book might be exactly what you need.’
chaz-1
 
Photo credit: Chaz Hutton | @instachaaz | The Sticky Note Guide to Life
In Dalston a second execution features one of Chaz’s iconic illustrations ‘A map of every city’ and includes pens in a box in the right hand corner so passers-by can add more.
sticky-note
@instachaaz and A Sticky Note Guide to Life

Spotify uses data in latest global OOH campaign to highlight bizarre listening habits

‘Thanks 2016, It’s Been Weird,’ Says Spotify in Biggest-Ever Global Campaign
By Alexandra Jardine for Creativity

Streaming Service Signs Off the Year With Out-of-Home Push in 14 Markets…

Spotify has kicked off its largest-ever global campaign with a major, data-driven outdoor push in which it bids goodbye to 2016 with the sign-off, “Thanks 2016, it’s been weird.”
The out-of-home ads pluck quirky, amusing, hyper-localized facts and figures from its own data. For example, a U.K. poster reads: “Dear 3,749 people who streamed ‘It’s The End Of The World As We Know It’ the day of the Brexit Vote. Hang in There.” One U.S. execution reads: “Dear person who made a playlist called: ‘One Night Stand With Jeb Bush Like He’s a Bond Girl in a European Casino.’ We have so many questions.” Some executions are super-localized: a New York poster reads: “Dear person in the Theater District who listened to the Hamilton soundtrack 5376 times this year. Can you get us tickets?”
The campaign begins rolling out in the U.S., the U.K., France and Germany today (Nov. 28) and then to a further 10 markets (Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, Indonesia, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines and Sweden). It was developed in-house by Spotify’s internal creative team in New York, supported by insight from its regional teams around the world.
Spotify CMO Seth Farbman told Creativity that the idea for the data-driven campaign originated with 2015’s end-of-year “Year in Music” campaign, as it transpired that data from listeners in different geographical areas provided some interesting insights. “That led to the idea of reflecting culture via listener behavior.”
“There has been some debate about whether big data is muting creativity in marketing, but we have turned that on its head,” he added. “For us, data inspires and gives an insight into the emotion that people are expressing.”
In order to be as hyper-local as possible, Spotify decided to focus primarily on OOH advertising, Mr Farbman explained. “It has the ability to really drive clever copy home that other media can’t always do as well.”
Other elements of the campaign, set to roll out in the run-up to Christmas, include emails to customers on their own personal usage of Spotify, and digital and social ads that also use the data-driven insights.
Source: Creativityonline

Snapchat hypes Spectacles with quirky Snapbot sales channel

Snapchat will not be launching its new camera-equipped sunglasses Specs through shops but in a very limited number of vending machines, starting in Venice Beach in Los Angeles.
Dubbed Snapbots, the vending machines are visually striking and sophisticated, allowing browsers to see a picture of themselves with a virtual pair of Spectacles in order to pick one of the three colours (coral, black or teal).
On purchase, Specs will come fully charged and ready for making videos. They are designed to capture ten-second video clips from their wearers’ perspective and are paired with a phone by Bluetooth.
As expected, the Venice Beach vending machine sold out on its first day. Some Spectacles buyers quickly listed their pairs on eBay, priced at up to $1,000 (£795).
Snapbots will only be found in the US and Snapchat (which now calls itself Snap) has not commented on UK plans.
The vending machines will only be present in a location for a day at a time, and their arrival will be announced 24 hours in advance on spectacles.com.
Specs cost $129 (£103) plus tax.
Snap Inc. has recently been promoting its Spectacles release with an OOH camapign across several cities.
snapbot1 snapbot2 snapbot3
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Via: CampaignLive

Former ISBA Media Chief Joins FEPE International

FEPE International, the global federation for the out of home industry, has today (10th November) announced the appointment of Bob Wootton as Executive Director Designate with immediate effect.
He will work alongside current Executive Director and industry doyen John Ellery until the next FEPE Congress in Stockholm in June 2017, after which he will assume a fuller role.
John Ellery, Executive Director FEPE, said: “I am delighted that Bob Wootton has agreed to join the FEPE team. We’ve worked together and known each other for many years and I know that his enthusiasm and his media and out of home knowledge will be a great asset for FEPE International.”
Matthew Dearden, outgoing Clear Channel CEO EMEA and current FEPE President, said: “John has played a huge role in building FEPE and the OOH industry worldwide to the status it enjoys today. In Bob Wootton we’re fortunate to have someone who can build on this to take the industry into a new era of positive growth.”
Bob Wootton said: “Out of home offers the very best of both worlds – brand fame at scale and hyperlocal targeting and integration.
“I’m delighted to be joining FEPE at such an exciting time for the industry.  John, general secretary Mark Flys and the team have done a great job establishing FEPE as the go-to place in out of home.
“I’m looking forward to maintaining this momentum and helping drive FEPE even further forwards.”