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Peugeot Creates Social Poster Campaign to Launch New 108 Model

Peugeot has teamed with designer Adam Pobiak to create 108 limited edition silkscreen posters to push its new 108 model and is offering fans the chance to win one via a new social campaign.
With help from social marketing agency 33seconds, the car marque will use CRM to identify and reach out to new owners of the 108 and ask them to tweet and share a photo of them with their new car, holding up a sign with the hashtag #My108.
The first 108 to take part will win one of the limited edition posters, with other entrants set to receive a digital print.
The campaign aims to promote the personalisation element of the new car: with each poster individually numbered with an abstract interpretation of the creative themes.
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Via: The Drum

Agency Crowdsources ‘Selfie Speeding Signs’ to Display on Interactive Billboards

Would a billboard better get your attention if it pictured a friend, family member, or even yourself? That’s the idea behind a new campaign collecting selfies to deter speeding.

In Belgium, they use happy (and sad) faces on their speed limit signs. The signs, which react in real time to drivers’ speeds, display a happy face when the driver is within the limit and a sad face when the driver exceeds the limit.
While that’s already far more interesting than the signs in America, Antwerp-based Duval Guillaume, working with local government, has taken things a step further. Enter the Selfie Speeding Sign.
A poster campaign urged local residents to upload two photos of themselves. One with a happy face and one with a sad face.
The images were then placed on additional interactive billboards equipped with a speed sensor. If passing drivers are within the speed limit, they’ll see a smiling selfie. If they exceed the limit, they’ll see a sad selfie.
The agency has set it up so that the images only appear on boards near where the person submitting the selfie lives, so as to pretty much guarantee that the pictured person and all their family members will be out and about to see the board, take a picture of it and share it on social media.
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Via: Marketing Land

Will Driverless Cars Signal a New Opportunity for Roadside Posters?

The UK is set to allow driverless cars on the roads of Britain from January 2015. Business secretary Vince Cable said computer-controlled vehicles will be trialled in three cities next year, and the government will be making a £10m fund available for developing the technology in the UK. But what’s this mean for the out of home (OOH) industry?
Alarmists are likely already jumping at the chance to declare this the beginning of the end for roadside OOH sites. After all, if no one’s driving the car, who’s looking at the road and the adverts around it?
However, this is a something of a short-sighted position to take. In fact, driverless cars could be of tremendous value to the OOH industry. These automated vehicles will collect and generate a huge amount more data, which will enable advertisers to target their messaging to passengers far more accurately. Data is already being used innovatively for OOH targeting, such as a recent Mini campaign that used car recognition technology to display personalised content whenever a Mini driver passed a poster site. As driverless cars increase the data set available, the techniques and technology used to leverage it will become far more sophisticated.
Driverless cars also open up a huge new area for advertisers, as all of a sudden former drivers will have a great deal of time on their hands. Broadcasters, entertainment companies like Netflix and media giants like Google will be competing over an entirely new smart car entertainment ecosystem. There’s even the potential for these companies to subsidise the cost of the cars to ensure they are a part of the environment. Google’s already been looking at how it can monetise free taxi rides in driverless cars – serving ads in automated taxis to passengers during their ride rather than charging a fare. This opens a new opportunity for OOH to influence consumers’ digital behaviour, an attribute the medium has proven itself to excel at already.
As time moves on and we come to better understand the new consumption behaviours driverless cars will breed, the OOH industry is going to gain a much greater understanding of the impact of location. If driverless cars do become the norm, we’ll need to redefine what makes a ‘good’ OOH location beyond traditional high value locations to entirely new sites designed to capture the attention of a new generation of window gazers.
Passengers may well fill some of their time surfing the web, watching a film or reading a book, but that won’t be all they do. Natural human curiosity to know where you are and what’s out there, the stop-start nature of urban travel and an inevitable increase in motion sickness will keep passengers gazing out of the window. To all the naysayers, I implore you to think back to your last car ride as a passenger – did you take a look out of the window during the ride?
Ben Milne- Head of Innovation, Posterscope UK
Via: The Wall Blog

Optical Illusion Ad Demonstrates the Power of Ford’s Parking Assistance

To demonstrate the power of its automated parking technology, motor brand Ford created an ad that features a simple optical illusion.
Viewers are first instructed to stare at the white car for 30 seconds. Next, they are told to shift their focus to the empty space between the two black cars.
Just like magic, the car would have seemed to park itself in the empty lot—highlighting how easy and simple it is to use Ford’s ‘Park Assist’ technology.
The ad was created with the help of BBR Saatchi & Saatchi
Via: Design Taxi

Clever Volkswagen Ads Show You Can’t Look at Two Places at Once

To deter drivers from ‘text-driving’, Volkswagen—with the help of German advertising agency Grabarz Partner—has created a series of clever print ads.
Each ad features two tiny images that are widely separated by a line of text, which says “Try looking at both at the same time”.
Viewers would find it difficult to focus on both images, highlighting the message that Volkswagen hopes to bring across—that it’s impossible to focus on the road while texting.
Via: Design Taxi 

Cromwell Road Revs Up for New BMW i8 Campaign

Over the next two weeks, Clear Channel’s flagship Cromwell Road site will be home to a full-scale, 600-kilogram fibreglass replica of the new BMW i8 – the innovative hybrid sports car from one of the world’s leading car manufacturers.
BMW has taken over all six Cromwell Road advertising panels for their stunning out-of-home advertising campaign. An elevated ramp has been built to create the illusion of the replica i8 driving along a road, bringing the advert to life. The campaign was planned and booked by Vizeum and Posterscope.
Nicola Green, BMW’s Marketing Communications Manager – Brand and New Model Launches, said: “The i8 is a car which stands out – its design, innovation and performance. As such, it was important for us that when marketing and promoting this model, we did something a little bit different.  The Cromwell Road placement allows us to do that in an eye-catching and exciting way.”

Audi Headlights Create Giant World Cup Scoreboard in Brooklyn

For the World Cup, Audi has created a giant scoreboard that will display the results of matches using the headlights of 28 Audi A8 cars. The flagship sedans are stacked together within 45 shipping containers and collectively stand over 40 feet tall, making it visible from not only miles away, but also from airplanes. The installation is on the shores of Greenpoint, Brooklyn, offering a spectacular view to Manhattanites across the river, and will be live through July 14th.
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Via: psfk

Audi's Instant Valuation Billboard

Trading in a car for a newer model is a process, and getting your current set of wheels appraised is arguably the first (and most tedious) step. For this reason, Audi Brazil teamed up with AlmapBBDO to cut out the middleman. The result was a different kind of drive-thru.
The Instant Evaluator debuted in Sao Paolo at Brazil’s World Trade Centre. There, an Audi appraiser trolled the parking lot and noted unattended cars’ features and input various data on the wheels on a tablet. He then printed out an RFID tag and stuck it to the vehicle windows.
Later, as drivers exited the parking lot, they passed before the “Instant Evaluator,” an LED billboard with built-in sensors. It scanned the RFID tags and then on the spot, provided potential Audi buyers with some valuable data; an assessment of their cars’ worth, the amount they would need to pay to trade it in for a new Audi model and the number of instalments it could be paid in.
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Via: Creativity Online
 

Powerful Anti-Text Driving Ad Shocks Moviegoers to Keep Their Eyes on the Road

To remind people to keep their eyes on the road while driving, Volkswagen created a powerful and interactive shock campaign.
Called ‘Volkswagen Eyes on the road’, the ad was shown as a trailer at the MCL Cinema in Hong Kong. It starts with a driver getting into a car and going off for a drive.
A text message from a location-based broadcaster is then sent to moviegoers in the cinema, causing many of them to take out their phones and look away from the cinema screen.
At this instance, the driver suddenly loses control of his vehicle and gets into a sudden and deafening crash—leaving moviegoers in shock, reminding them to keep their phones away while driving.
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Via: Design Taxi

KIA’s ‘Optical Illusion’ Ads Warn of the Hidden Dangers on the Road

German advertising agency Gürtlerbachmann created these ‘optical illusion’ ads for car brand KIA to warn drivers of the hidden dangers on the road.
Created with black-and-white diagonal lines, the ads will make you do a double take as they deceivingly spell the words ‘rock’, ‘tree’, and ‘deer’ out.
Are you able to spot the hidden words?
Via: DesignTaxi