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Sleeping Drunks Become Human Billboards

Just like many people around the world, the Japanese like to let their hair down by having a drink or two—or in the case for some, one too many.
The result is drunk sleeping—people who get so intoxicated, that they end up sleeping on the streets.
To shame these drunks, ad agency Ogilvy & Mather and Tokyo bar chain Yaocho have teamed up in a campaign that turns these people into PSA billboards.
Called ‘The Sleeping Drunks Billboard’, the sleeping drunks are framed using white tape and turned into streetside human billboards. The hashtag ‘#NOMISUGI’ is used to caption them, which translates to “too drunk”.
When members of the public encounter these impromptu billboards, they are encouraged to capture them on Instagram—shaming these people into behaving better and to drink more responsibly.
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Via: Design Taxi

Cisco Launches Connected Billboard in San Francisco

Cisco has placed an Internet-connected billboard on Rt. 101 near San Francisco International airport that will deliver specific messaging based on a driver’s speed in order to highlight what it calls “the Internet of everything.”
Cisco and its agency, Goodby Silverstein & Partners, have been working for nearly a year on the idea and it could have bigger implications for outdoor advertisers looking to deliver more customized messages.
Cisco and Goodby designed the billboard so that a message is delivered to the board based on how fast a driver is going. They set four speed ranges with four different messages. For example, if a driver is moving under 22 miles per hour (which is highly likely in the area) they will see a message stating “The Internet of Everything is changing this billboard based on your speed. So you see only what you have time to read. Sorry about the slow going.” At the bottom of each billboard is the Cisco logo and tagline “Tomorrow starts here.” The faster the speed, the shorter the message.
Via: Ad Age

A Billboard That Does Good

A giant poster that uses nanotechnology has been created by a scientist and an award winning poet from the University of Sheffield.
The two professors came up with the idea of a poster absorbing poisonous compounds from the air with the aim of cutting disease and saving lives.
The poster can absorb poisonous compounds from around 20 cars each day if put by a busy road.
The 10m by 20m poster is coated with microscopic, pollution-eating nanoparticles of titanium dioxide. When the light hits the nanoparticles, they react with oxygen, and wash the pollution out of the air.
Although the poster does not filter out all the pollutants from traffic, it does remove nitrogen oxides which have been linked to breathing problems including asthma.
A poem by Simon Armitage, called ‘In Praise of Air’ features on the poster.
The poster will be on display in Sheffield for the next year.
Via: BBC

This Billboard Cleans the Air!

Peru is in the middle of a construction boom that generates a lot of unhealthy pollution. Peruvian engineering university UTEC and its ad agency, FCB Mayo, decided to create an air-purifying billboard designed to mitigate the environmental damage the school causes as it builds a new campus.
The billboard has the added advantage of promoting the new campus, boosted by the claim that the school will help students learn how to do things like create billboards that filter about 100,000 cubic meters of clean air a day, reaching as far as five blocks away and equivalent to what some 1,200 trees would do.
The environmentally friendly campaign is part of a tried-and-true strategy for UTEC and FCB Mayo. Last year they famously created a billboard that helped address a rainfall shortage in Lima by converting atmospheric humidity into clean drinking water.
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Via: AdWeek

Lingerie Brand’s Smoking Hot Ad Literally Sets Billboard On Fire

To show that their lingerie is too hot to handle, German lingerie company Blush set a billboard on fire, literally.
Created by Berlin-based ad agency Glow to advertise Blush’s winter sale, the billboard comprised of a 20-meter-long fuse in the shape of a woman and the brand’s logo made from 2,543 matchsticks, with the words ‘hot sale’ below it.
While the actual burning was over relatively quickly, it was a creative way of promoting the brand’s lingerie and no doubt attracted the attention of passersby. 

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Via: Design Taxi

Audi Uses Optical Illusions to Promote its Hazard Detection System

To promote Audi’s pre sense plus hazard detection system, a billboard with an optical illusion was created to show that people overlook “obvious hazards” on the road.
The blurred text reads, “You’re driving. It’s dark. Suddenly”. As the passersby gets closer, the last part of the copy emerges, imitating a driver’s experience of noticing, at the last minute, an imminent danger on the road.
The clever manipulation of the text to accommodate the gaze of our eyes, shows that we are in need of a hazard detector when our eyes fail us at night.
Watch how this clever visual trick worked in the video below.
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Via: Design Taxi

Summer Billboards Come With Removable Beach Towels and Flip-Flops

In New Zealand soft drink maker L&P have created some very clever advertisements reminding people to ‘hold on to summer’. The posters literally give away summer gear. Some of the ads are draped with removable beach towels while others have foam flip-flops that you can pry out.
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Via: AdWeek

Digital OOH Media Exposure Up 75%

Digital out-of-home media exposure surged 75% between 2007 and 2013, second only to mobile, according to new research from PQ Media.
As the global media economy nears a digital tipping point, PQ Media’s latest ‘Consumer Exposure to DOOH’ global report suggests that DOOH media may be on the verge of an industry breakout, with the average global consumer exposed to various DOOH media for 14 minutes per week in 2013 compared with eight minutes in 2007.
According to PQ Media, growth has been driven by consumers spending a record amount of time with media outside their homes, increased engagement during the day with corresponding content on DOOH screens that are linked to wireless devices, longer work commutes and consistent growth in leisure travel and shopping hours.
The data also indicates that improved designs, content, interactivity and ‘mobile couponing’ are extending dwell time with screens.
By 2017, PQ Media expects DOOH exposure to increase at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 8.6% to 20 minutes on average per week, while traditional OOH revenues are expected to rise at a 4.1% CAGR.
Via: MediaTel

Renovated With OBI

The agency Jung von Matt/Elbe came up with a creative way to advertise for the German DIY company OBI.
Instead of distributing ugly flyers that detailed their promotions, the creative team used the company’s DIY products to give a section of some ruined and rundown buildings a makeover.
These renovated buildings stood out from the drab streets, showing people how these products can be used in a fun and creative way.
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Via: Design Taxi

McDonald's Sweden Taunts Norway With Big Mac Billboard at the Border

Here’s a fun neighbor-shaming McDonald’s billboard from DDB Stockholm.
Sitting right at the border between Sweden and Norway, the billboard displays comparative pricing for Big Macs in the two nations—egging on Norwegians to take advantage of Sweden’s cheaper burgers. In other words, it’s the rare fast-food ad that doubles as fodder for exchange-rate geeks.
Via: AdWeek